Is Comparison A Sin

We all like to compare ourselves to other people. We do it in school, at work, and on social media. We compare our salaries with our friends’, our homes with our neighbors’. It’s human nature to want what we don’t have and to want others to know that we have more than they do. But when this tendency becomes extreme or obsessive—when it steals our joy and causes envy or covetousness—it can become a sin against God and others (Exodus 20:17).

Is Comparison A Sin

It’s hard to be satisfied with who we are when we’re constantly comparing ourselves to other people.

As humans, we have a tendency to compare ourselves to other people. We compare our looks, careers, interests and hobbies. Comparing yourself to others can be dangerous because it can make you feel like your life sucks when in reality there are lots of things to be happy about.

Here are some tips on how you can avoid the comparison trap:

  • Make sure that your expectations of yourself or other people are reasonable and realistic
  • Don’t compare yourself with people who are out of your league (i.e., supermodels or millionaires)
  • Try not to measure how well you’re doing by comparing yourself with others

We live in a world of comparison. It’s part of life.

We live in a world of comparison. It’s part of life. Whether we’re comparing our accomplishments to others’, or sizing up the opposite sex, we’re constantly trying to evaluate ourselves from the outside-in, rather than from the inside-out.

Comparison is intrinsic to how we learn and grow as people and it’s also central to our competitive nature as human beings, but that doesn’t mean it’s always good for us. When comparison becomes excessive or leads us down paths that aren’t healthy for us (e.g., body shaming), then it can become problematic and even detrimental—especially when those comparisons are focused on others who are better off than ourselves.

Comparison can become a sin when it makes us miserable and steals our joy.

Comparison is not a sin. It’s natural, and you can’t avoid it. When you compare yourself to others, you may be inspired by their successes or dejected by their failures. You might think everything would be better if you had what they have or were like them in some way. And sometimes, comparison can motivate us to make positive changes in our own lives that help us reach our goals faster than if we hadn’t compared ourselves at all.

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However, comparison can also become harmful when it makes us feel bad about who we are and the things that are already working well in our lives—and this feeling of discontentment will steal away your joy!

So how do we keep this good habit from turning into a bad one? The answer lies in choosing your perspective wisely: ask yourself whether comparing yourself with someone else is making them feel good or bad about themselves (or helping them find joy), then determine whether doing so has any negative consequences for your own feelings about yourself (or ability to find happiness). If the answer is “yes,” then consider switching gears and focusing on something else instead—anything from enjoying nature around you to connecting with friends who love everything about who they are!

When you compare yourself to others, your brain gets fixated on their positive traits.

One of the main reasons why it’s not a good idea to compare yourself to others is that you tend to focus on their positive traits, which can lead you to feel inadequate. For example, if you compare yourself to someone who has more money than you do and then decide that your life is less meaningful because of it, then chances are that negativity will seep into other parts of your life as well.

So how can we avoid getting stuck in this negative spiral? One way is by focusing on our own goals instead of those of others. Instead of getting hung up on what other people have achieved or are doing now, choose a path for yourself based on what matters most to YOU!

You see their talents, your weaknesses. You see their popularity, your isolation. You see their success, your failures.

It’s easy to get caught in the comparison game. We all do it, even if we don’t like it. Your friend gets a raise, and you think about how much more money you could make if only you were the one with that job title. Your neighbor buys a new car, and suddenly your old car feels like a clunker. Or maybe you’re at work, feeling underappreciated by your boss or colleagues—and then someone else gets some recognition for their work and suddenly you feel inferior again.

But there’s actually nothing wrong with these thoughts: They’re natural human reactions that can be useful for self-reflection and learning about ourselves (if we choose to take them seriously). The problem comes when we start believing these comparisons are more than just observations—when they become our reality instead of just an opinion of someone else’s situation or circumstances: “This person has more friends than me; therefore I am not worthy or lovable enough to be loved by anyone else.”

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The problem becomes when you decide the other person has everything you want and is everything you wish you were.

The problem becomes when you decide the other person has everything you want and is everything you wish you were. They may be happy, fulfilled, and successful in life, but that doesn’t mean they are perfect. It doesn’t mean they don’t have their own flaws or imperfections either.

You could look at every single aspect of this person’s life and compare it with yours until there is nothing left to compare. But if we were to do that in real life, we would quickly realize how ridiculous it sounds! We wouldn’t want someone else to do that exact thing with us either!

Then you set out to change yourself into that person or wish you were them in some way or another.

The key to this is that comparison can be a sin when it leads you to try to change yourself into someone else.

But, you can’t change yourself into someone else. You can only change your behavior, how you think about things, your circumstances and perspective on life, or even your habits or health if it has to do with physical appearance/shape (exercise).

Comparing yourself to others causes envy and covetousness, which are sins against God and others, because it leads us to desire what does not belong to us (Exodus 20:17).

Comparing yourself to others is a sin because it causes envy and covetousness, which are sins against God and others. Envy brings contention between people (Proverbs 13:10). Covetousness is the desire for something that belongs to another person (Exodus 20:17).

God created us as individuals. We must focus on what God says about us rather than on how we think others feel about us. We must not covet what others have, nor should we envy them (Deuteronomy 5:17-19; Proverbs 30:8-9).

We have the tendency to pick something we perceive as lacking in ourselves and then covet that thing in someone else.

As we’ve said, comparison is a sin. But it’s also something that is inevitable in life. We have the tendency to pick something we perceive as lacking in ourselves and then covet that thing in someone else. We want what they have because we don’t believe we can have it for ourselves.

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To avoid this trap and keep from being condemned by your own thoughts, focus on your strengths instead of the perceived weaknesses of others. You will find yourself content without having to envy others or compare yourself unfavorably with them at all!

To combat self-comparison, remember that God made each of us individually and uniquely (Psalm 139).

Self-comparison is a sin when it causes you to compare yourself to others and think less of yourself. This can be detrimental to your self-esteem, which can lead to depression or other mental health issues. To combat this sin, remember that God made each of us individually and uniquely (Psalm 139). He loves each one of us equally and unconditionally. Each one of us has our own set of talents, gifts, strengths, weaknesses and quirks—and we should embrace them all!

We must focus on what God says about us rather than on how we think others feel about us

It is important to remember that God loves us and has a plan for us. This means that He knows you better than anyone else, even better than the people closest to you.

He has a purpose for our lives and for each of us individually. To discover your calling in life, we must turn from looking at others’ successes and failures because this can discourage us from following our own paths toward success.

Conclusion

We must focus on what God says about us rather than on how we think others feel about us. We may not be able to control how they feel, but we can control our reaction to their feelings—and in doing so, we can live a life free from envy and covetousness.

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